06 July 2015

Tips for packing a nutritionally balanced low FODMAP lunchbox

Tips for packing a nutritionally balanced low FODMAP lunchbox  [FODMAP & Kids: 2/3]

By Dr Peta Hill - Research Dietitian

TOP LEFT - Gluten free wrap (containing buckwheat & sorghum flours) made with 1/8 avocado mixed with lactose-free cream cheese and roast turkey


TOP RIGHT - Brown rice crackers, sliced cheddar cheese


CENTRE - Homemade low FODMAP muesli bar with pumpkin seeds


BOTTOM LEFT - Cherry tomatoes, cucumber


BOTTOM RIGHT - Orange


Building a healthy lunchbox for your child is hard enough without the added complication of dietary restrictions – even temporary ones like the low FODMAP diet. 


Here are some tips to guide your packing:


1. START WITH A LITTLE LOW FODMAP SEASONAL FRUIT


  • Think of a serving size similar to your child’s fist.


Handy hints

Cutting up fruit and putting it into a smaller container for protection prevents squashing and is quick and easy for kids to eat. 


2. ALWAYS INCLUDE PROTEIN


This helps to fill kids up. If your child comes home “starving” and tends to over indulge in afterschool snacks and then isn’t hungry for dinner, consider increasing the protein content of their lunchbox.

Good sources of low FODMAP protein include:

  • MEAT & POULTRY (e.g. leftover roast meats, garlic and onion free patties and meatballs or deli meats),
  • FISH (e.g. tinned tuna/salmon, smoked salmon, garlic and onion free fish patties),
  • EGGS (e.g. hard boiled eggs, frittata, egg slices),
  • NUTS (if your child’s school permits!) & SEEDS (e.g. 10 almonds/hazelnuts/peanuts/mixed nuts, pumpkin/sunflower seeds or homemade trail mix/muesli bars/spreads made with Low FODMAP nuts* and/or seeds*) as well as
  • DAIRY PRODUCTS (e.g. hard yellow cheese, lactose free yoghurt/custard).

*Ensure low FODMAP quantities by consulting the Monash University Low FODMAP diet app.


Handy hints 

While it’s a good idea to fill sandwiches, wraps and rolls with protein, it can also be included separately.


3. ADD SOME VEGETABLES/SALAD

The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating recommends around 5 serves of vegetables for school aged children, making it nearly impossible for kids to get the veggies they need just from their dinner plate.


Handy hint

Dips can make vegetables more appealing for some kids.  Try lactose free cream cheese or a homemade low FODMAP dip with garlic-infused oil. 


Click here for our https://www.monashfodmap.com/blog/a-low-fodmap-family-affair/ or try https://www.monashfodmap.com/blog/its-starting-to-taste-lot-like-christmas/


4. INCLUDE WHOLEGRAIN BREADS & CEREALS

Choose breads, wraps, crackers and biscuits based on low FODMAP whole grains, such as, brown rice, buckwheat*, millet, oats*, quinoa, sorghum, or spelt sourdough*.


*Ensure low FODMAP quantities by consulting the Monash University Low FODMAP diet app.


Handy hint

When baking, choose recipes that incorporate whole grains, such as our https://www.monashfodmap.com/blog/low-fodmap-anzac-biscuits-recipe/


Final tip

Always include a water bottle and keep food fresh and safe, use ice blocks or frozen water bottles and an insulated bag.

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